MEDI-TRIVIA VOL. 3: IS BROKEN HEART SYNDROME REAL?

Yes, it is real! Broken Heart Syndrome is also known as “stress-induced cardiomyopathy or takotsubo cardiomyopathy” When we say cardiomyopathy, it is a disease on the heart muscle. The heart may become thick, rigid or enlarged. This was first described by the Japanese in year 1990 where patients presented with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzyme levels, have ST-segment elevation or in other words, it mimicked the acute coronary syndrome. But when the patients undergone cardiac angiography, it only showed a left ventricular apical ballooning and no significant coronary artery stenosis. That is why it is also called as “Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy” because tako tsubo in Japanese are octupus traps that resemble the pot-like shape of the stricken heart.

A. Angiogram of normal left ventricle in systole shows contraction of all myocardial segments. 
B, Angiogram of left ventricle with takotsubo defect shows contraction of the base with akinesis of the apex. 
This transient heart condition is often brought on by stressful situations such as death of a loved one or a terrible break up can be possible. People may experience a sudden chest pain like it’s as if they are going to have a heart attack and shortness of breath. Woman are more likely experience broken heart syndrome and this may be caused by the heart’s reaction to a surge of stress hormones. Stress hormones like the cortisol and adrenaline are elevated during stressful events can put your heart at risk.
It is reversible within a week or just a few weeks after from the onset of pain. The person should see a doctor when chest pain and shortness of breath already lasted more than a month for it can lead to a sever, short-heart failure. Complications may also be hypotension due to heart failure, back up fluid of lungs or pulmonary edema or disruptions of heart beat.
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0 Comments

  1. I'm going through a broken heart syndrome while reading this post, it brought back the memories of the past lol (Hahaha char char rah). Anyway, this is a well elucidated article and I'm learning a great deal from this post. I have hardly met this kind of term though, and it's a help for I'm able to identify this kind of syndrome.

  2. If your unconscious self wants to block those memories, yes, some memories may be hidden away in a cabinet with a lock and some pieces will end up in your conscious memory. It depends on how traumatic the experience was and how you cope with it AJ.

  3. First heard about this in college. This is sensationalized by the #hugot people of the Philippines. Hahahahaha! Even up to this day, I really suck at reading the ECG results. I prefer to insert dislodged intravenous fluid in Ward 9. Hahahaha! I can do that the whole day.

  4. Very timely with all the people throwing out hugot lines! Haha! Now we know that a condition really exist and its totally irrelevant to being "broken hearted".

  5. I've read some bits of info about that sinking feeling in your gut that you get when you're worried or really nervous and I do think in a way, that's kinda related with this one in that they are both brought upon by stressful situations. It's pretty good to actually know about it being an actual physical condition though. Maybe one day, we can use it as a valid excuse for, say, being absent at work? Hahaha!

  6. I've never had my heart broken nor broke anyone's heart (I hope not haha). But I didn't know that it is scientifically possible to get your heart broken. Thought it was an expression. haha Good to know.

  7. It seems logical for the body to have physical emulations of abstracts like a broken heart or butterflies in the stomach. They're generated in our brains and where else should these thoughts manifest? 🙂

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